Where do the particles go?

Where do the particles go?

Did you ever rub a balloon on your hair and stick it to the ceiling? The balloon sticks because you’ve created static electricity on the surface of the balloon. This energy is non-moving static charge. Every material is made up of atoms and they are the basic building blocks of ordinary matter and they can join to form molecules, which is a basic ingredient of most of the objects around us. An atom can hold a positive charge that is called a proton or a negative charge that is called an electron. Atoms with the same charge or polarity repel each other, while those with the opposite charge are attracted to each other. Just like the balloon scenario, static is created by the contact and separation of two materials. The same is true of when you walk across a carpet and touch the metal door knob and get a shock. We call these electrostatic forces, tribo-charging, which renders a plastic material in a state where it can attract dust and other particulates.

Let’s face it, we are using more plastic in our every day lives, from cars to single use medical devices that may end up inside of the human body. Plastic, being highly insulative, can store huge amounts of static electricity. If we just look at the medical device sector, one of the biggest reasons for rejects, rework and potential device failure, is from foreign particles that end up in the finished device. These particles could be in the form of airborne contaminants, plastic flash, skin flake, human hair and other debris that is found in the manufacturing process. Static eliminators in the form of ionizing air guns, nozzles and ionizing blowers are used to negate the ill effects of electrostatic forces that pull particles right out of the air and hold them to a device or components. The use of ionized air is absolutely a good practice, but the problem is “where do the particle go”? Typically, they hang around and end up on the work surface to be a source of re-contamination or the particles end up downstream on already cleaned products.

Enter the Particle Trap® 6000. The Particle Trap® 6000 (PT6000) is the solution to getting rid of particles in the assembly and packaging areas of the medical device manufacturing process. The PT6000 is a source capturing system with a HEPA filter on the exhaust. You can still use the conventional ionizing air blow-off devices, but when working in front of the opening of the PT6000, dislodged particles now are delivered through a pre-filter and then through the HEPA filter, ensuring only clean air is let back into the room. The PT6000 is used not only to clean medical components, but it is especially helpful when used at the packaging level, just prior to the heat sealing of a lid stock to the thermoformed tray. The same would be true for pouching of products such as a catheter on a die cut card being slid into a long plastic bag and then sealed at the end. Normally, most medical device manufacturers do a 100% inspection for foreign matter/particles inside of the seal trays. If a particle is discovered, the lid is ripped off, the product taken out, recleaned and then repackaged. This reject rate is also called the tear down rate, which translates into poor yields, time and money along with customer dissatisfaction, when a product gets through that is not totally cleaned.

Who would benefit from the Particle Trap® 6000? The Particle Trap® 6000 and its sister products, the PT Mini, Particle Trap® CUBE and Medical Cleaning Systems. While the medical device sector has endorsed these products, they also have application in the optics, food and electronics industries for the same reason why all companies are looking to lower their tear down rates, which translates to higher profits. If you want to learn more about how Particle Trap® products can help improve your process, please contact our technical sales team for more information.

It’s That Shocking Time of the Year

It’s That Shocking Time of the Year

Ethanol; Intoxicating or Explosive?

This week, especially because it’s December and so close to the Christmas holiday, I worked on an alarming application that involved a static hazard. 100% ethanol was poured from a plastic container, which held approximately 5 gallons of the liquid, into smaller or larger containers that were also made of plastic.  Ethanol is a colorless, volatile liquid.  Most people recognize it as the ingredient in liquor, which has an intoxicating effect on most people.  However, it is also used as a solvent which can ignite under certain conditions.  Static electricity is one of the three components necessary to create an event, which is a soft way of saying an arc-over, a fire or an explosion.  The other two ingredients are oxygen and a volatile vapor.

There are well established protocols for handling and working with ingredients that can go “boom in the night”.  The front line of defense in protecting oneself from mishaps is grounding everything that is capable of being grounded. If we take a simplistic approach and look at the world as being made of only two materials, insulators and conductors, you can get a better sense of safety procedures that will keep to us out of harm’s way.  Metal is a conductor and easily grounded by clamping onto a known building ground or electrical ground or even by driving a rod deep into the earth.  Hence, we call it an earth ground. A water pipe inside of a facility can also act as a good ground source.  By grounding the metal, electrons can flow through the metal to ground itself. Conversely plastic cannot be grounded. This is why my static application hit a bump in the road. Static is generated on plastic materials through friction which we call Tribocharging.  There are a myriad of types of plastic, but for the most part, assume that all plastics are huge static generators.  Plastics are insulators and not conductive so the energy generated by simply handling plastic stays on the surface and can be a source of ignition.

Static Hazard

In my static hazard application, an ungrounded person holding the ethanol picks up an ungrounded plastic container and pours it into another ungrounded container.  This is not a good situation.  During the pouring process, a potentially explosive, volatile vapor cloud forms around the pouring action in both the dumping container and the receiving container.  There are three possible opportunities that can cause ignition in this scenario: a discharge from the ungrounded tech who is pouring the flammable ethanol; a discharge from static on the container which is high enough in proximity to the vapor cloud which forms in the discharging plastic container; a discharge from static to the same cloud that can form in the receiving plastic container.  If a static charge is present, with enough energy behind it, there is a strong chance that any of these actions can create a safety hazard.   

A Grounding Solution

Finding a solution to this problem can be a bit tricky.  The basic approach is to ground everything that can be grounded or switch to materials that can be grounded.  Simply switching from plastic containers to metal is a huge step in the right direction.  There will be times when grounding is not possible and materials cannot be changed.   In that case, ionization is the only choice.  There are approved ionizing static bars and blowers that remove or greatly reduce static electricity on plastic materials.  Static Clean and Fraser AntiStatic Techniques of England have formed a strategic alliance / partnership to address these dangerous scenarios.  When you have concerns about your facility and the safety of workers who may be in harm’s way, please reach out to Static Clean for help.   At this special time of year as with any time of year, it is important to always think “safety first”.

How Static Affects the Summer Olympics

How Static Affects the Summer Olympics

Achieving Peak Performance

The Summer Olympics are in full swing and the elite athletes are always trying to find ways to achieve peak performance.  Sometimes the difference between winning a gold or silver medal is decided on a tiny margin and can depend on achieving the smallest advantage. The 2016 Summer Olympics were held in Brazil and temperatures were in the mid 80’s during the day with high humidity.   Manufacturers of sporting apparel spend huge sums of money on the research and development of clothing and other products that work with the human body.  Athletic shoes have been engineered to be lighter with better foot protection, and clothing has been made to feel so minimal it’s like wearing nothing at all. The integration of Lycra® fabric is one of the most common innovations in achieving comfort, fit and performance.

How Lycra® Moves Us

Lycra® is a registered brand name for a polyurethane-based synthetic fiber that’s also called spandex or elastane. The DuPont Company® first developed Lycra® in 1958 to replace latex rubber as a stretching agent in clothing.  Lycra® is prized for its strength and durability, and is almost always mixed with either cotton or polyester.  Although Lycra® accounts for only a small percentage of the final fabric, it is key in retaining the look and feel of the other fibers. An estimated 80% of clothing sold in the United States contained spandex in 2010.  Because of its ability to mold to the body, Lycra® is ideal for use in swimwear and sportswear.  It was once thought 100% cotton was best for sportswear because of its ability to breathe.  Science has actually shown us that 100% cotton can raise body temperature, making it difficult to move at a high levels of performance.

The Buzz About Lycra®

The buzz word today is to look for clothing that will wick sweat away from an athlete’s skin.  How does this help someone towards a competitive advantage, and how does it work?  For the sake of discussion, let’s focus on swimming.   High performance athletes care more about reducing suit drag, skin friction and water absorption.  Lycra® along with other fabrics containing Lycra® offer the best performance and value.  It is actually hard to find any cotton in good swimwear these days.  Reducing drag is probably the most important factor.   As the material or a body moves, the lower the frictional impact of a material against air, wind or water, the more a body can lower its resistance.   This is very similar to static electricity when the lowest coefficient of friction will lower the static on a body or material.

Lycra® is a highly static material, but when intimate to the human body, the level of static is lowered.  That is why you see swimmers use bathing suits like Speedo® that are tight fitting.  The same can be said for those who wear tight clothes when racing bicycles.

The Static Eliminator

At Static Clean International we work with some of the world’s largest manufacturers of Lycra®, Polyester and other well accepted athletic materials.  During the weaving process of these materials, the static levels are very high and many of the defects found in these materials are due to static during the processing.  A little static cling can cause high defect rates, especially when running high speed clothing manufacturing equipment.  Our products eliminate static during the manufacturing process. However, once the finished product is on the human body, the static is collapsed by being intimate to the body and static is no longer an issue.  We have a keen understanding of how frictional forces during a race or a swim meet are reduced because the material of choice has a lower coefficient of friction that allows the clothing to have less resistance in motion.  From our position, we can feel good about the fact that we have helped those who compete by improving the quality of what they wear.

 

All That Glitters Is Not Gold

Meaning

“All That Glitters Is Not Gold” Not everything that is shiny and superficially attractive is valuable.

Origin

The original form of this phrase was ‘all that glisters is not gold’. The ‘glitters’ version long ago superseded the original and is now almost universally used.

Shakespeare is the best-known writer to have expressed the idea that shiny things aren’t necessarily precious things. The original editions of The Merchant of Venice, 1596, have the line as ‘all that glisters is not gold‘. ‘Glister’ is usually replaced by ‘glitter’ in modern renditions.

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Cleaner Means Safer..

Sometimes the smallest parts are the trickiest to clean.  At Static Clean our customers often bring us size challenging parts and devices to work on. Until recently no one in our industry has been able to address these challenges. Static Clean has now developed a method using our Medical Cleaning Station and Medical Cleaning Station-AS cleaning benches to batch clean these small part products. We have a Stainless Steel sieve that is fed through the upper and lower hoods that are part of our MCS line.  We had a potential customer from New Jersey who was amazed at how well it worked. Before he arrived, he went to a Michael’s store with his daughter and bought all kinds of colorful glitter that you would use for arts and crafts.  He used the glitter to contaminate the white caps that you see in the video.  It was overkill but a very good test.  The white caps that you see here go on the top of things such as suspension bottles, eye drop bottles, contact lens cleaning bottles etc.  If they have particles, plastic bits, human hair or any foreign matter, it could be the cause of a health problem.   Our batch cleaning system worked so well that he has said he is interested in purchasing not one but two MCS Systems and commented that “it worked better than I ever anticipated”.

For more information on our MCS or MCS-AS Cleaning benches, contact our technical sales department today.

Static Innovates for High Reliability

Shocking Technology!

Static Clean International has developed a new breed of transformer-based high-voltage line-frequency AC power supplies (e.g. TSN75A and TNS75E 7500Vac PSs) relying upon patent-pending technology for application in ionizing equipment. This new technology has been so far applied within SCI static-neutralizing equipment systems and within SCI ionizing blowers.

The longstanding conventional technology within the industry relies upon the use of sound-muffling and corona-resistant materials to pot over the underlying iron-core transformer. The high-voltage secondary winding of the iron-core transformer generates partial discharge of encapsulated air bubbles at normal operating voltages. This limits MTBF of such equipment due to eventual chemical breakdown of the organic polymers subjected to the continuous slow and insidious damage from corona.

The user HV connections (if applicable, as in some static-neutralizing systems with HV-cable user-mounted components) in the conventional power supplies also require proprietary methods and tooling to fabricate the secondary section of the transformer that are only used within the ionizing equipment industry for the most part.

Warning! High Voltage..

SCI’s new technology is a form of resistive coupling between transformer secondary winding and ionizing electrodes circuitry. It enables the use of more common transformer fabrication methods and raises the partial-discharge inception voltage (aka PDIV) to levels above normal operating voltage for the equipment. It provides some regulation (i.e. high-voltage stability) for non-ferroresonant HV transformer topologies, and it enables the quick-connect/disconnect de facto standard (threaded spring-contact) for ionizing equipment systems that contain a user-mounted HV-wire component as well as similar equipment-internal spring-contact HV connections that are desirable for assembly and reliability.

We at SCI believe that a superior cost-performance-quality trade-off can be achieved with the new transformer/resistive-coupling methods for some products, and are continuing with ongoing new product development based upon this proprietary technology and provides a high reliability solution.  New products in the field have demonstrated excellent robustness with respect to the common failure mode of HV-secondary dielectric breakdown.

The Real Heart of the Month

The Heart of the Matter

Is it February already? Where did January go? With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, it got me to thinking about roses, chocolate, love, the color red, hearts, giving your heart to the one you love, American Heart Month, heart disease and organ donation, specifically hearts.

While the first few things I mentioned are rather cliché and Valentine’s day which is sometimes referred to as the “Hallmark Holiday”, people tend to forget the more important things about the month of February; The Real Heart of the Month.  Did you know that The American Heart Association has declared February 5th, 2016 as National Wear Red Day? A day that is now dedicated to help raise awareness for heart disease and stroke in women.  This year marks the 13th anniversary of National Wear Red Day and huge strides towards awareness on heart disease have been made, here are some successes:

  • Nearly 90% of women have made at least one healthy behavior change.
  • More than one-third of women have lost weight.
  • More than 50% of women have increased their exercise.
  • 6 out of 10 women have changed their diets.
  • More than 40% of women have checked their cholesterol levels.
  • One third of women has talked with their doctors about developing heart health plans.
  • Today, nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day.
  • Death in women has decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years.

Don’t Miss a Beat!

Despite the progress there is still more work to be done, one in three deaths among women each year is caused either by heart disease or stroke.  Approximately every minute one of these women dies in our country alone, more than 500,000 a year.  It is the #1 killer in women, yet only 1 in 5 women believe that this is a great health risk for them.  Perhaps our lack of awareness is due to the media and how many heart problems portrayed on television, commercials, and infomercials involve a man as opposed to a woman.  With proper education – many of these deaths,  for men and women, are preventable.  That is why the entire month of February is now dedicated to raising awareness of cardiovascular health, American Heart Month.  Uncontrolled high blood pressure is the leading cause of heart disease. There are pills that will help regulate your blood pressure, but it’s very important to live an active and healthy lifestyle as well.  Educate yourself, learn the warning signs, visit www.heart.org or www.goredforwomen.org to learn more about how you can educate yourself – you might save your life or the lives of your loved ones.  Be a sweetheart & explore the real heart of the month.

In the spirit of love – consider organ donation.  Did you know that “121,514 people are waiting for an organ? 22 people will die each day waiting for an organ.  One organ donor can save up to eight lives”.

Static Clean understands the importance of American Heart Month.  We have donated to the cause and will continue to provide static and contamination control products to hospitals and medical companies that need to use clean, contamination-free equipment on you and your loved ones. We also have a number of people within the company that are organ donors. From all of us here at Static Clean to you and your loved ones – have a blessed, loved & aware month!

Resources:

Goredforwomen.org

Wikipedia

Organdonor.gov